Welding and organising.

Great to meet up with several of the artists in the Frome Museum last week and for us all to consider how our various creations will work amongst the collections and display cases. Back welding in my studio this weekend assembling the Fairy Cave cabinet and organising the contents in readiness for glazing and installation in the quarry in a week.

e QuarryWelding #2

Duncan Cameron  13/9/15

Collecting feathers and bones.

e August Box #2

Spent the evening exploring the Fairy Cave perimeter and collecting feathers and old metal washers. The quarry echoing with the sharp clinks of climbers enjoying the last evening sun on the cliff face and the ever-present crow calls. I had intended to cast more tracks however the recent heavy rain meant that the the little mud was underwater with large puddles covering large areas of the quarry floor.

e August Box

e August Box #4

e August Box #5

 

 

Duncan Cameron  1/9/15

Back in Fairy Cave Quarry – Evidence

A terrific afternoon and early evening exploring Fairy Cave quarry. Walked the perimeter collecting evidence of natural history and human activity and picked up snail shells, feathers, broken plastic car light fragments, pieces of ceramic, a glove, a wheel, a watch, bones, unusual stones and many other treasures for mounting and presentation. Worked with card and plaster to cast interesting tracks in the little mud that remains and stood alone in the middle of this wonderful sunken void as the rooks called and the light faded.

e August Quarry #1 e August Quarry #2 e August Quarry #3 e August Quarry #4 e August Quarry #5 e August Quarry #6 e August Quarry #7

 

Duncan Cameron  7/8/15

Sculpture in a day.

Enjoyed a terrific day at the Somerset Earth Science Centre working with competition winner Charlotte McKeown making her ‘sculpture in a day’. We all collaborated to grind, weld, glue and assemble the conveyor belt inspired piece and were delighted to help charlotte successfully complete the work in time for the 5-o-clock opening.

e SESC Charlotte #2 e SESC Charlotte #1 e SESC Charlotte #3 e SESC Charlotte #4

 

 

Duncan Cameron  17/7/15

Opening Week – STEP 1

Our opening week of Step 1: installing artwork, signage, running school workshops, guided walk, making a sculpture in a day, press launch and official opening at Somerset Earth Science Centre has been a whirlwind of activity!

4 of us spent 2 days setting up artwork inside and around the grounds of SESC.  My artwork forstep in stone includes both new work inspired by features of the quarries (for Steps 2 & 3) and pre-existing work (for Step 1) that reflect how the quarries resonate with my interest in life forms.  The installation of my floating pieces involved adventures in a boat.   2 helpers were enlisted from Moons Hill quarry (both called Paul) to assist with this.  Slightly perturbed by the strangeness of it all to start with, they were soon singing rowing songs – delighted by the novelty once they relaxed into their new roles and we floated the first ‘Diatom’ in the water.   My other installations meant climbing up tall ladders, and wrapping ‘Lichen’ round a tree with helper Nigel.  Duncan Elliott dragged his heavy stone pieces up the road on a trolley, and built huge scaffolding frames to hoist up his ‘Age of Stone’ – a back-aching job, but worth the effort – it is magnificent!  Tessa Farmer arrived on a train from London laden with her intriguing boxes of insects, miniature evil fairies, worm casts and bell jar – the intricate work taking her hours to install – and Christina White set up her beautiful multi-exposure photographs in the Centre against limestone walls.

Some of this process was documented by Duncan Simey (see ‘wild-landscapes’ photos below) and filmmaker Jack Offord, for our final documentary film.

Installing Diatoms on Monday

 

Diatom

"'step in stone' installation at the Somerset Earth Sciences Centre"

"'step in stone' installation at the Somerset Earth Sciences Centre"

"'step in stone' installation at the Somerset Earth Sciences Centre"

"'step in stone' installation at the Somerset Earth Sciences Centre"

"'step in stone' installation at the Somerset Earth Sciences Centre"

"'step in stone' installation at the Somerset Earth Sciences Centre"

"'step in stone' installation at the Somerset Earth Sciences Centre"

"'step in stone' installation at the Somerset Earth Sciences Centre"

"'step in stone' installation at the Somerset Earth Sciences Centre"

"'step in stone' installation at the Somerset Earth Sciences Centre"

"'step in stone' installation at the Somerset Earth Sciences Centre"

We opened on Wednesday 8th July, and have already had a wide range of visitors of all ages engaging with our work, including 2 school groups through Somerset Art Works’ inspirED programme and some guided walkers through our collaboration with Somerset Wildlife Trust.  My half day workshop was with Yr 7 pupil premium students from Selwood School.  In small groups they created group wire pieces based on silver birch seeds.  Suzie’s workshop the next day with Castle School students resulted in felted balls using locally sourced wool.  Both sets of work will be exhibited as part of the Trail at Halecombe Quarry from Step 2 onwards.

Guided Walk at SESC Rubbings IMG_0368

Our first week culminated yesterday in the making of Charlotte McKeown’s sculpture with her in just one day.  This was her award for winning for our ‘Under 20’s Sculpture Design Competition’.  A bit like scrapheap challenge, a small, dedicated team worked hard to create the sculpture in a day.  Despite having prepared materials and got some parts together for it, the challenge was still a little daunting.  Our team included Charlotte, Lucja Korczak, who won the under 13 year-old design competition prize, her mum Aga, Duncan Cameron (step in stone artist and Strode College tutor to Charlotte), Nick Weaver (step in stone Partner) and me.  Perhaps the best thing about yesterday was how everyone worked together so well to make it happen and with such aplomb!    A slight rush to finish before the arrival of press and guests for our official opening at 5pm, the sculpture was installed by the Centre entrance.  Sarah Jackson from Mendip Hills AONB kindly did the honours to ‘open’ the event, and we all celebrated the start of an exciting few months ahead!

Kinetic Sculpture design - Charlotte McKeown

IMG_0383 IMG_0397 IMG_0400 IMG_0409 IMG_0420 IMG_0429 IMG_0430 IMG_0441 IMG_0453 IMG_0454 IMG_0466 IMG_0479 IMG_0490 IMG_0498 IMG_0506 IMG_0509 IMG_0515 IMG_0521

 

 

Thanks to Gill Odolphie and Juliet Lawn at SESC for putting up with us all week and supporting us throughout!

 

Do please come and visit Somerset Earth Science Centre (SESC)  – open to public Weds 9am-4pm & special events

Artists exhibiting at SESC: Fiona Campbell, Duncan Elliott, Tessa Farmer, Christina White, Charlotte McKeown – young sculpture design competition winner

 

Fiona Campbell   12/7/15

 

Working on Charlotte’s sculpture

A good day working with Charlotte McKeown, the young sculpture design competition winner, in the Strode College workshop. We made good progress with the development of her fantastic sculpture ideas in advance of the launch day at The Somerset Earth Science Centre next weekend.

eCharlotte STEP STONE

 

 

Duncan Cameron 30/6/15

More on-site experimentation.

Spent a terrific couple of hours in Fairy Cave quarry as the sun went down, this silent and huge sunken world echoing with the calls of roosting crows. Excited to find clear animal tracks along the retreating muddy margins of a large puddle but without my plaster casting equipment this evening so I had to console myself with the experimental collection of lost metal artefacts by using a large magnet to ‘drag’ for treasure. I only collected a series of small pins and nails but I think the techniques has potential and I may rig up a simple wheely mechanism so that I can keep the magnet pointing straight at the ground as I walk the quarry. Made notes about horizon features and considered my mapping ideas and the recording of tree silhouettes before returning to the van, parked amongst the derelict buildings in the dusk.

eSTONE magnet

 

Duncan Cameron  29/6/15

Considering Quarry Bones

e Quarry Bones

I’m considering the deer bones that I collected in the quarry and how they can form part of the cabinet collection. The vertibra are particularly beautiful and I’m considering casting and drawing from them and also how I may raise them up within the cabinet I am now building. The bones are of course also a testament to the vertiginous nature of the excavated quarry walls and tragic evidence of the lost lives of the luckless creatures that have fallen over the edge, their bones now winkled from the rocks by an enthusiastic forensic artist.

Duncan Cameron  23/6/15