Installing the gabions with Terry

It rained on and off during installation today. Many many thanks to our rock climber and supporter Terry. He did a fab job of climbing down and attaching the gabions for me .

All equiped for the climbTerry up the rock faceTerrys great job donethe sun came out eventually

 

Cath Bloomfield  24/9/15

Advertisements

Overnight in the Quarry

After a number of cancelled dates, due to the weather, I finally managed to spend Tuesday night in Fairy Cave quarry. The mini 12 hour expedition allowed me to observe the space on it’s own terms. Quietly lying up on the ridge I watched the sun setting over the west horizon, listened to the rooks and jackdaws roosting and then their calls replaced by those of the tawny owls that live in the woods around the quarry perimeter. Dark by 8pm, I lay making notes and observations as part of the collection case artwork.The moonlight and clear night allowed me to walk around the quarry by moonlight alone, a place with a very different character than in the daylight, the long monochrome shadows, the reflections of the moon in the many puddles and the vast black quarry walls. Woken at 2am by a barking fox and at 4am the constellation of orion came up over the rocky butress at the south end of the small ridge on which I was sleeping. The sun began to rise at about 6am and by the time I packed up to get to off to work at 8am the West wall was brightly illuminated in the warm morning sunshine as the sun crested the woods at the top of the Eastern cliff.

e Overnight in QUARRY

 

Duncan Cameron  24/9/15

Lost and Found Caves

It’s been fun exploring materials I don’t often use together – wax, paper, oil, cloth, chicken wire… to go with scrap steel remnants I found in the quarries for a new piece to be installed at Fairy Cave.  Thanks to Rowena Pearce for her recycled wax donations!

The work’s about the lost (destroyed) and found caves at Fairy Cave Quarry.  Photographs by Duncan Simey of the formations within and Andy Sparrow’s film ‘A Rock and A Hard Place’ have helped bring the caves to life for me… I may even go down them one day soon!

Experimental work for Fairy Cave

Fiona Campbell   16/9/15

Welding and organising.

Great to meet up with several of the artists in the Frome Museum last week and for us all to consider how our various creations will work amongst the collections and display cases. Back welding in my studio this weekend assembling the Fairy Cave cabinet and organising the contents in readiness for glazing and installation in the quarry in a week.

e QuarryWelding #2

Duncan Cameron  13/9/15

Going Underground: molehills and beyond

“Out of the Earth ii” at Halecombe Quarry. Photos Duncan Simey

I’ve been intrigued by molehills for many years. As a student in Oxford I lived next to the University Parks, home to abundant moles and their earthy mounds. I constructed a motorised mole hill (on top of a remote controlled car) and controlled it from afar, startling unsuspecting passers by.

I always notice molehills now and ponder the unseen, underground activity they hint at. Moles are rather fascinating animals. According to wikipedia: “A mole’s diet primarily consists of earthworms and other small invertebrates found in the soil, and a variety of nuts. The mole runs are in reality ‘worm traps’, the mole sensing when a worm falls into the tunnel and quickly running along to kill and eat it. Because their saliva contains a toxin that can paralyze earthworms, moles are able to store their still-living prey for later consumption. They construct special underground “larders” for just this purpose; researchers have discovered such larders with over a thousand earthworms in them. Before eating earthworms, moles pull them between their squeezed paws to force the collected earth and dirt out of the worm’s gut.” I’ve taxidermied a few moles over the years and used them in pieces to be preyed upon by the fairies but haven’t incorporated a mole hill until now. At Halecombe quarry along the conservation area which surrounds and overlooks the working quarry moles are plentiful. The neat mounds of fine soil excavated by the moles’ incredibly strong forearms and paddle like feet echo the huge industrial scale digging and excavation below.

For Step in Stone I am imagining underground colonisation by the fairies. At Halecombe this is hinted at by a single erupted molehill that reveals fairy architecture and moles enslaved by the fairies to expand and extend their usurped domain for their own purposes. At Fairy Cave their lair will exist deeper underground, amongst extinct fossilised sea creatures but also incorporating specimens of thriving extant wildlife. Amongst other materials I’m using a serpulid (wormshell) colony, wasp nest segments, mouse bones, insects and bats.

Installation day at Westdown Quarry

Photo by Duncan Simey

wormshellcolony

Serpulid colony

 

 

Tessa Farmer  7/9/15